How to apply Japanese minimalist, Zen design to your home?

If you want to introduce Zen-taste minimalist design, what are the tips? There are several critical Zen aesthetics such as “subtraction”, “condensation” and “absence” that strongly influenced modern minimalist design. Find them through MUJI and other iconic product design.

Engawa

Engawa, the narrow wooden strips attached around the periphery of a house has been an indispensable part of the traditional Japanese house, functioning as a sun porch, a workshop, a venue for socializing and a buffer to shield the house from harsh weather. Learn more about its various faces and versatile applications.

Anonymous is beautiful: “The Profiles of Design” by Naoto Fukasawa

Japanese product designer Naoto Fukasawa quotes from his book “The Profile of Design.” Find where his minimalist, quiet yet powerful design came from.

Aesthetics of “emptiness” by Kenya Hara

Kenya Hara is a Japanese graphic designer who has been playing a pivotal role shaping MUJI’s brand philosophy. As a member of MUJI’s Advisory Board since 2001, along with Naoto Fukasawa, he strengthened the concept of “emptiness,” which is behind MUJI’s minimalist design.

Peculiar perspective of sustainabile architecture (quick read)

MUJI House: 15 years, 4 models to help owners design their own unique life style

MUJI entered the home building business in 2004 (only in Japan) with the model 木の家 (Ki no Ie, Wood House) to provide a simple, universal, compact yet highly editable platform that is meant to last for decades. It added its forth product 陽の家 (Yō no Ie, Sun House) in 2019, marking its 15th year. Find more about MUJI house.

Japanese architecture: is it really natural and sustainable?

Many people think that Japanese architecture is uniquely sustainable and in harmony with nature, and has a new potential to become an alternative to modern-era architecture. Is it true? The key is “aesthetics.” Unique perspectives on naturalism by Kengo Kuma, Toyo Ito, Sou Fujimoto, Tadao Ando.