How to apply Japanese minimalist, Zen design to your home?

If you want to introduce Zen-taste minimalist design, what are the tips? There are several critical Zen aesthetics such as “subtraction”, “condensation” and “absence” that strongly influenced modern minimalist design. Find them through MUJI and other iconic product design.

The aesthetics of “absence” in Ukiyoe: Hiroshige – One hundred of Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige was an Ukiyo-e master excelled in emphasizing essential elements only. His One Hundred Famous Views Edo is a prime example of his aesthetics of subtraction and absence.

The MOMAT Exhibition- Window: A Journey of Art and Architecture through Windows (2)

The MOMAT Exhibition- Window held in Tokyo in early 2020 showcased a unique perspective in the relationship of art, architecture and Windows.

The art of “less is more” in music: Tiny Desk Concerts reveal how pure musicianship looks like

The MOMAT Exhibition- Window: A Journey of Art and Architecture through Windows

Kare-sansui (Japanese Zen rock garden): ultimate beauty of absence

History of Japanese aesthetics 1: the Heian period and Mono no aware

Roll back the clock 1,000 years to the Heian Era to find the origin of the elusive and ambiguous Japanese aesthetics where the aristocrats explored the culture of “mono no aware.” It is amazing to find how much the aesthetic style had changed, but the fundamentals remain the same to this day.

History of Japanese aesthetics 3: Muromachi and wabi-sabi

History of Japanese asethetics (3) reviews Muromachi era (1336-1573), which coinsided with the early Renaissance in Europe. However, Zen-influenced, minimalist aesthetics were the opposite of Renaissance.

History of Japanese aesthetics 2: the Kamakura period and mujo

History of Japanese aesthetics (2) reviews civil war-ridden Kamakura era (1185-1333) and the aesthetics of mujo, which produced highly philosophical/poetic inward-looking, hermit culture.