Peculiar perspective of sustainabile architecture (quick read)

Japanese architecture: is it really natural and sustainable?

Many people think that Japanese architecture is uniquely sustainable and in harmony with nature, and has a new potential to become an alternative to modern-era architecture. Is it true? The key is “aesthetics.” Unique perspectives on naturalism by Kengo Kuma, Toyo Ito, Sou Fujimoto, Tadao Ando.

Toyo Ito and “Home-for-All” (Minna-no-Ie) – Can People Shape Architecture?

Architect Toyo Ito has been on his journey to re-define the purpose of “modern architecture” through his disaster relief efforts following the Tohoku Earthquake/Tsunami that affected Northeastern Japan in 2011. Learn about his efforts through his “Home for All” project and the Venice Biennale 2012 Japan Pavilion: “Architecture. Possible here?”

MUJI Passive house

MUJI house tries to achieve optimal indoor thermal comfort relying on minimum energy. House design (passive design), not just energy efficiency, is the key.

Shigeru ban projects in progress: La Seine Musicale

In-depth report: “Projects in Progress” by Shigeru Ban

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban’s “Projects in Progress,” his second solo exhibition held in Tokyo in 2017, featured La Seine Musicale, the Tainan Museum, The Watch Company (Swatch + Omega), and some disaster relief projects among many other ongoing projects.

Yoshino Cedar House x Airbnb: True sharing enabled by “people”

Yoshino Cedar House is a collaboration between Airbnb and Yoshino-cho, a rural Japanese town in Kansai and a producer of high quality cedar. As it struggles to compete in a global market in which prices and efficiency are everything, this project paves new opportunities for true sharing.

So we’ve lost the game of economic efficiency. Now what?

Rural areas are distressed. Traditional, heritage-rich industry, culture and communities are disappearing. What are the options for all of us to shine?

Japanese architects on “natural materials”

What are natural materials and why do we love them? Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori and Kengo Kuma’s peculiar views on natural materials.

Peculiar perspective of sustainable architecture