MUJI Food and snacks: small meals extravaganza!

MUJI offers a large selection of food/snacks in Japan, which are like the minimalistic version of Trader Joe’s. Packaged small to upgrade unfairly undervalued “eat alone” experiences, their rich flavors/aroma will lighten your busy day, “Umami” therapy – instead of aroma therapy – anyone?

Chapter 3-5: MUJI House – Edit your own life style

MUJI solar cooking scale – inspiring everyday product

Many daily household items are not a feast for the eyes, and you are not inspired or excited when you use them. But does it have to be that way? The MUJI cooking scale is just beautiful in design and delivers great functionality (and is semi solar-powered). It is inspiring to find how just one aesthetically pleasing cooking scale can uplift your life.

MUJI Passive house

MUJI Hut: tiny house dissolving into the environment

MUJI released a “hut” in 2017 which is even tinier than a “tiny house.” Coming with the interior size of 9.1 m2, it delivers agility, mobility and flexibility you would never expected from a house. “Place it anywhere you want,” says MUJI. With the MUJI Hut, you are almost free to choose your ideal location to spend your time.

MUJI Oak Bench: Minimalist, agile and versatile

MUJI’s simple, minimalist Oak Bench is a “tote” bench. It’s agile, mobile and will add lively and flexible flow, movements and accents to your room.

MUJI x UR: MUJI beautifully fixes-up old-fashioned urban apartments

MUJI started selling houses in 2004, and the project has been evolving. They now collaborate with other parties to re-invigorate outdated building stock. Discover their philosophy and strategy on how to re-discover the value of old homes, minimize disposal of old parts and adjust them to today’s living environment.

Discover the magic of smallness: MUJI’s toothbrush stand

Many everyday products are designed based on the assumption that “bigger is the better.” But MUJI’s tiny toothbrush stand – one of their best selling items – reminds us that small is simply beautiful. Small items fit our body and our living environment so smoothly and consciously. They let you engage and take control your own life.

Re-discovering human-size comfort: MUJI’s Good Fit Right Angle Socks

How much is sufficient? “80% Full Product” by MUJI

Pursuing “just right” (not too much, not too little), MUJI uses the slogan “fitness80” to ask what the “just right” level/amount is for humans.

Aesthetics of “emptiness”: Kenya Hara, designer of Zero

Kenya Hara is a Japanese graphic designer who has been playing a pivotal role shaping MUJI’s brand philosophy. As a member of MUJI’s Advisory Board since 2001, along with Naoto Fukasawa, he strengthened the concept of “emptiness,” which is behind MUJI’s minimalist design.

Anonymous is beautiful: “The Profiles of Design” by Naoto Fukasawa

Naoto Fukasawa’s style is very unique: it talks a lot without uttering any words. His sleek, minimalist and quiet design makes you feel like it’s almost dissolving into the surroundings. However, while his products blend with the environment, their beauty and charm stands out silently, yet powerfully. There is something very magnetic and engaging in his work.

Why is MUJI’s minimalist design called Zen?

The Japanese household brand MUJI is often dubbed “commercial Zen” for its no-frills, minimalist design and approach. But exactly what kind of Zen aesthetics are seen in MUJI? Two prominent designers Kenya Hara and Naoto Fukasawa give us inspiring clues.

Tanada Terrace Office: MUJI x Atelier Bow-Wow House Vision 2016

MUJI’s Tanada Terrace Office was developed as an extended office installed in a rural area in order to explore a flexible and organic relationship between urban workers and rural farmers. MUJI employees would work at Tanada Office installed in the outskirt of Tokyo when local farmers need extra hands. Thanks to the technology, we only need a PC and wi-fi connection to perform work.

Want to design your own living style? apply for MUJI House

MUJI challenges our strong belief that houses are “bigger, the better.” Meet their lovely, engaging houses — exactly because they are small.