Tents: tiny house for modern nomads

The synchronicity of the tiny house and nomad movement may be telling us that it’s time to go back to the basics. It’s time to remember the spirit of the conic/triangular shape. Fortunately, with state-of-the-art technology, we can transform traditional tents into something more flexible and comfortable enough to fit in modern life style.

Toyo Ito Interview in Omishima: Architecture then, now and next 3

I spent a morning with Toyo Ito on Omishima island in 2018, where the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari opened an exhibit “Protecting = Creating the Sacred Island of Omishima.” Enjoy Ito’s inspiring story of architecture then, now and next.

Toyo Ito Interview in Omishima: Architecture then, now and next 1

I spent a morning with Toyo Ito on Omishima island in 2018, where the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari opened an exhibit “Protecting = Creating the Sacred Island of Omishima.” Enjoy Ito’s inspiring story of architecture then, now and next.

Toyo Ito Interview in Omishima: Architecture then, now and next 2

I spent a morning with Toyo Ito on Omishima island in 2018, where the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari opened an exhibit “Protecting = Creating the Sacred Island of Omishima.” Enjoy Ito’s inspiring story of architecture then, now and next.

Toyo Ito Omishima Project: Omishima Minna-no-Winery

Architect Toyo Ito founded the Omishima Minna-no-Winery in 2015, an inspiring endeavor to convert abandoned orchards in a small, rural yet history-rich island in the Seto Naikai into vineyards, so that the relinquished assets can be transformed into new values and opportunities for the island.

Rural is the new black: Toyo Ito Omishima Project

After decades of progressive endeavors exploring new opportunities of urban living by translating the “modern” in a unique way, Toyo Ito is going rural. And there is a profound reason behind this. You will discover how he’s come to see the end of the modern system, and how he is finding a new future on the small island called Omishima in Western Japan, that still retains people’s potential embraced by a unique local environment. Going rural is the new black beyond modernism.

Toyo Ito Omishima Project: Omishima Ikoi-no-Ie

大三島 憩の家 (Omishima Ikoi-no-Ie) is one of the few visitor accommodations in beautiful Omishima Island in Seto Naikai, Western Japan. Architect Toyo Ito is heavily involved in the revitalization activities in Omishima, and Ikoi-no-Ie is one of the flagship projects that renovated old elementary school.

Experience the sukiya-zukuri: Setouchi Minato no Yado

In scenic/historic Onomichi City, Hiroshima, you can stay at an exquisite, traditional Japanese sukiya-style house renovated by a local business Discoverlink Setouchi. Named Setouchi Minato no Yado, the houses overlook downtown and stunningly beautiful Seto Naikai Inland Sea.

Big ambition from a small island: Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari

The Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari is located on a small, traditional island in West Japan. After decades of progressive architectural experiments based in Tokyo, Toyo Ito is pursuing the future of architecture on this heritage-rich island that has been preserved from aggressive modernization.”

Chapter 2-4: Effect of subtraction on your satisfaction

Bay Area Maker Faire: Not for beginners because…

2017 Bay Area Maker Faire just completed its 3days celebration. Whereas it’s huge and comprehensive, it may not be good for beginners. Why?

Proudly inefficient: true meaning of “Right to repair”

Defend your “right to repair,” says iFixit. Apple fights back to protect their IP. Why things became this complicated? It’s economic efficiency.

MUJI Hut: tiny house dissolving into the environment

MUJI released a “hut” in 2017 which is even tinier than a “tiny house.” Coming with the interior size of 9.1 m2, it delivers agility, mobility and flexibility you would never expected from a house. “Place it anywhere you want,” says MUJI. With the MUJI Hut, you are almost free to choose your ideal location to spend your time.

Yoshino Cedar House x Airbnb: True sharing enabled by “people”

Yoshino Cedar House is a collaboration between Airbnb and Yoshino-cho, a rural Japanese town in Kansai and a producer of high quality cedar. As it struggles to compete in a global market in which prices and efficiency are everything, this project paves new opportunities for true sharing.

So we’ve lost the game of economic efficiency. Now what?

Rural areas are distressed. Traditional, heritage-rich industry, culture and communities are disappearing. What are the options for all of us to shine?

Kengo Kuma: Our cities need to “ferment”

Kengo Kuma leads the world of architecture by focusing on offering new ways to connect our delicate body to nature. What is his view on attractive cities?

Circular economy 300 years ago

Circular economy already existed 300 years ago in Edo (Tokyo). It was filled with lively, resilient people and opportunities for design. Get inspired by their energy and creativity.

MUJI x UR: MUJI beautifully fixes-up old-fashioned urban apartments

MUJI started selling houses in 2004, and the project has been evolving. They now collaborate with other parties to re-invigorate outdated building stock. Discover their philosophy and strategy on how to re-discover the value of old homes, minimize disposal of old parts and adjust them to today’s living environment.

Re-invigorate distressed economic areas without relying on economic tools

Weary of never-ending, ever-intensifying economic game to create winners and losers based on efficiency, there is an increasing momentum to re-invigorate ailing economic regions by not relying on conventional economic tools.

Yoshino-sugi Cedar House : Go Hasegawa x Airbnb

Airbnb & Go Hasegawa designed Yoshino Cedar House to re-brand traditional values denied by modern economy. Airbnb helps locals share such values globally.

Haramaki, Heattech or MUJI?: waste heat recovery of the people, for the people

Zen perspectives in Tony Hsieh’s Downtown Las Vegas Project