Tents: tiny house for modern nomads

The synchronicity of the tiny house and nomad movement may be telling us that it’s time to go back to the basics. It’s time to remember the spirit of the conic/triangular shape. Fortunately, with state-of-the-art technology, we can transform traditional tents into something more flexible and comfortable enough to fit in modern life style.

Toyo Ito Interview in Omishima: Architecture then, now and next 3

I spent a morning with Toyo Ito on Omishima island in 2018, where the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari opened an exhibit “Protecting = Creating the Sacred Island of Omishima.” Enjoy Ito’s inspiring story of architecture then, now and next.

Toyo Ito Interview in Omishima: Architecture then, now and next 1

I spent a morning with Toyo Ito on Omishima island in 2018, where the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari opened an exhibit “Protecting = Creating the Sacred Island of Omishima.” Enjoy Ito’s inspiring story of architecture then, now and next.

Toyo Ito Interview in Omishima: Architecture then, now and next 2

I spent a morning with Toyo Ito on Omishima island in 2018, where the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari opened an exhibit “Protecting = Creating the Sacred Island of Omishima.” Enjoy Ito’s inspiring story of architecture then, now and next.

Toyo Ito Omishima Project: Omishima Minna-no-Winery

Architect Toyo Ito founded the Omishima Minna-no-Winery in 2015, an inspiring endeavor to convert abandoned orchards in a small, rural yet history-rich island in the Seto Naikai into vineyards, so that the relinquished assets can be transformed into new values and opportunities for the island.

Rural is the new black: Toyo Ito Omishima Project

After decades of progressive endeavors exploring new opportunities of urban living by translating the “modern” in a unique way, Toyo Ito is going rural. And there is a profound reason behind this. You will discover how he’s come to see the end of the modern system, and how he is finding a new future on the small island called Omishima in Western Japan, that still retains people’s potential embraced by a unique local environment. Going rural is the new black beyond modernism.

Toyo Ito Omishima Project: Omishima Ikoi-no-Ie

大三島 憩の家 (Omishima Ikoi-no-Ie) is one of the few visitor accommodations in beautiful Omishima Island in Seto Naikai, Western Japan. Architect Toyo Ito is heavily involved in the revitalization activities in Omishima, and Ikoi-no-Ie is one of the flagship projects that renovated old elementary school.

Big ambition from a small island: Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari

The Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, Imabari is located on a small, traditional island in West Japan. After decades of progressive architectural experiments based in Tokyo, Toyo Ito is pursuing the future of architecture on this heritage-rich island that has been preserved from aggressive modernization.”

Toyo Ito and “Home-for-All” (Minna-no-Ie) – Can People Shape Architecture?

Architect Toyo Ito has been on his journey to re-define the purpose of “modern architecture” through his disaster relief efforts following the Tohoku Earthquake/Tsunami that affected Northeastern Japan in 2011. Learn about his efforts through his “Home for All” project and the Venice Biennale 2012 Japan Pavilion: “Architecture. Possible here?”

MUJI “Wood House” model home in Kanagawa, Japan

We visited MUJI’s model house in Kanagawa, Japan. The model, the “Wood House,” is a “tiny house” of about 1,000 square feet that delivers edit-ability and flexibility you could never have expected in other homes. The secret? Efficient insulation and no walls that would otherwise have limited your option to leverage each corner of the space. Find out how it works.

In-depth report: “Projects in Progress” by Shigeru Ban

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban’s “Projects in Progress,” his second solo exhibition held in Tokyo in 2017, featured La Seine Musicale, the Tainan Museum, The Watch Company (Swatch + Omega), and some disaster relief projects among many other ongoing projects.

MUJI Hut: tiny house dissolving into the environment

MUJI released a “hut” in 2017 which is even tinier than a “tiny house.” Coming with the interior size of 9.1 m2, it delivers agility, mobility and flexibility you would never expected from a house. “Place it anywhere you want,” says MUJI. With the MUJI Hut, you are almost free to choose your ideal location to spend your time.

Yoshino Cedar House x Airbnb: True sharing enabled by “people”

Yoshino Cedar House is a collaboration between Airbnb and Yoshino-cho, a rural Japanese town in Kansai and a producer of high quality cedar. As it struggles to compete in a global market in which prices and efficiency are everything, this project paves new opportunities for true sharing.

So we’ve lost the game of economic efficiency. Now what?

Rural areas are distressed. Traditional, heritage-rich industry, culture and communities are disappearing. What are the options for all of us to shine?

Rental Space Tower by Sou Fujimoto (2): House Vision 2016

Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto is a master of ambiguity. With Rental Space Tower, he blurs boundaries between ownership and rental. New potential emerge.

Japanese architects on “natural materials”

What are natural materials and why do we love them? Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori and Kengo Kuma’s peculiar views on natural materials.

Open House with Condensed Core: House Vision 2016

Architect Shigeru Ban has been actively involved in disaster relief projects in many parts of the world, by designing and providing temporary shelters. When he imagined a next generation house, it became tiny, flexible, mobile, temporary, agile, editable and adjustable.

Where would millennials live when they go minimal?

Millennials are not interested in owning extravagant properties but instead are interested in investing in experiences. Their “ideal” house should look very different from older generation whose dream was to own a big house. What Sou Fujimoto imagined at House Vision may be the answer.

Shou sugi ban, primitive-modern architectural material

Yoshino-sugi Cedar House : Go Hasegawa x Airbnb

Airbnb & Go Hasegawa designed Yoshino Cedar House to re-brand traditional values denied by modern economy. Airbnb helps locals share such values globally.

Re-defining the future of living: House Vision 2016

Zen perspectives in Tony Hsieh’s Downtown Las Vegas Project

Shigeru Ban: Connecting nature and human through natural disaster (2)

Shigeru Ban: Connecting nature and human through natural disaster

“Great Transformation of Architecture”: Toyo Ito and Sustainable Architecture

Ito questions modern architecture, especially public infrastructure, which heavily relies on placing something big, hard and sturdy in-between nature and humans. Modern architecture and infrastructure attempts to draw explicit/irreversible boundaries between nature and humans, and that’s how they block the threats of nature from invading humans’ world.

Zero perspectives in “Small Architecture” by Kengo Kuma

Kuma’s book, “Small Architecture,” is full of inspiration that questions the myth of modern architecture, which has become excessively big, hard and alienating. He advocates small architecture as an alternative, due to its boundless potential.